Divine Mercy Sunday

Add to My Calendar 2021-04-11 2021-04-11 11 Divine Mercy Sunday The celebration of Christ's resurrection continues with this feast, which recognizes that God's love and mercy endure forever and overcome any sin that separates us from him. In the 1930s, Jesus appeared to St. Faustina Kowalska, a Polish nun, and directed her to promote his divine mercy worldwide. St. John Paul II canonized St. Faustina on May 1, 2000. Five days later the Vatican decreed that the Second Sunday of Easter would henceforth be known as Divine Mercy Sunday.  Ordinarily, parishes would host holy hours before the Blessed Sacrament, offer the sacraments of anointing of the sick and reconciliation and pray the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, Benediction, Praises of Divine Mercy, Litany of the Precious Blood or other prayers and songs in their churches. But this year, these events may be offered online or canceled because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Contact your parish directly for details. Our Sunday Visitor offers this suggestion: This year, consider praying the Chaplet of Divine Mercy "for those who have died because of the coronavirus and for their loved ones, for those who are working on the front lines to treat and combat the virus, for a swift end to the pandemic, for all those who are struggling with loneliness, anxiety and financial/job concerns, and for those who despair of finding God’s mercy, especially during this difficult time when so much of the Church’s healing ministry is restricted. 'Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy Immortal One, have mercy on us and on the whole world.'" All Parishes true DD/MM/YYYY

Sunday, April 11, 2021

Location: All Parishes

The celebration of Christ's resurrection continues with this feast, which recognizes that God's love and mercy endure forever and overcome any sin that separates us from him. In the 1930s, Jesus appeared to St. Faustina Kowalska, a Polish nun, and directed her to promote his divine mercy worldwide.

St. John Paul II canonized St. Faustina on May 1, 2000. Five days later the Vatican decreed that the Second Sunday of Easter would henceforth be known as Divine Mercy Sunday. 

Ordinarily, parishes would host holy hours before the Blessed Sacrament, offer the sacraments of anointing of the sick and reconciliation and pray the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, Benediction, Praises of Divine Mercy, Litany of the Precious Blood or other prayers and songs in their churches. But this year, these events may be offered online or canceled because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Contact your parish directly for details.

Our Sunday Visitor offers this suggestion: This year, consider praying the Chaplet of Divine Mercy "for those who have died because of the coronavirus and for their loved ones, for those who are working on the front lines to treat and combat the virus, for a swift end to the pandemic, for all those who are struggling with loneliness, anxiety and financial/job concerns, and for those who despair of finding God’s mercy, especially during this difficult time when so much of the Church’s healing ministry is restricted. 'Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy Immortal One, have mercy on us and on the whole world.'"